Skip to main content

Gray Triggerfish

Illustrator
Duane Raver, Jr.
Season
Open Year-Round
Size Limit
No Size Limit
Daily Limit / Person
No Limit
Delaware Range
Atlantic Ocean
Abundance in Delaware Waters
Common
General Habitat and Food Preferences
Preferring hard bottoms, artificial reefs, wrecks, and ledges, the Gray Triggerfish is found in nearshore and offshore waters often near floating objects.

They use their powerful teeth to dislodge and crush small mussels, sea urchins, and barnacles.
General Description
Gray Triggerfish are light gray to olive-gray to yellowish-brown.

There are 3 faint broad dark blotches on the upper body and often white dots and lines on the lower body and fins.

They have large incisor teeth (rat-like sharp teeth) and its body is covered with tough, sandpaper-like skin.
Did You Know?
Gray Triggerfish are not very good swimmers and could be considered a laid-back fish. When resting these fish sometimes rest on their side.

Triggerfish get their name from a set of upper spines they use to “lock” themselves into holes, crevices, and other hiding spots. The large spine can be "unlocked" by depressing the smaller, “trigger” spine.
Common Fishing Lures and Baits
Besides fishing over man-made artificial reefs, many anglers now investigate any floating structure or debris to find Gray Triggerfish.

A small hook on a dropper loop with a light weight, baited with clam, fiddler crab, green crab, or shrimp is ideal.
Typical Sizes Caught
Gray Triggerfish are commonly caught in the range of 1 to 3 pounds by Delaware anglers.
Citation Minimum Lengths/Weights
Length: 20 inches (for Live Release Award only)
or
Weight: 5 pounds

Note: Ocean triggerfish do not qualify
Delaware State Record
Gray Triggerfish:
6 pounds 5 ounces
Buddy J. Masten
2012

Note: Ocean triggerfish do not qualify