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Sandbar Shark

Illustrator
Duane Raver, Jr.
Season
CLOSED - no harvest permitted

Sandbar sharks must be immediately released to ensure the maximum probability of survival, without removing the fish from the water.
Size Limit
CLOSED - no harvest permitted

Sandbar sharks must be immediately released to ensure the maximum probability of survival, without removing the fish from the water.
Daily Limit / Person
CLOSED - no harvest permitted

Sandbar sharks must be immediately released to ensure the maximum probability of survival, without removing the fish from the water.
Delaware Range
Atlantic Ocean, Delaware Bay and Inland Bays
Abundance in Delaware Waters
Common
General Habitat and Food Preferences
The Sandbar Shark is a bottom-dwelling, shallow coastal water species that is seldom seen at the water's surface.

They feed primarily on small fishes, eels, skates, rays, dogfish, squids, shrimps, and crabs.
General Description
Sandbar Sharks are commonly mistaken for the bull shark.

The upper side is bluish to brownish gray with the underside a lighter shade of the same color to white.

The first pectoral fins are large and broad. The dorsal fins are differently shaped.

They have a defined interdorsal ridge (ridge of skin going down the back between the two dorsal fins).

The upper teeth are broadly triangular and serrated. The lower teeth are narrower and more finely serrated.
Did You Know?
Sandbar Sharks are the most common shark species swimming along the US Atlantic coast.

Sandbar Sharks are rarely associated with attacks on humans.
Common Fishing Lures and Baits
It is unlawful to release a Sandbar Shark in a manner that will not ensure the shark's maximum probability of survival (e.g., no gaffs, no clubbing, careful hook removal, etc.).

It is unlawful for any hook and line fisherman to remove a Sandbar Shark from the water.
Typical Sizes Caught
In general, Sandbar Sharks average 3 to 6 feet in length but reach lengths of 7.5 feet with a maximum weight of almost 260 pounds.
Citation Minimum Lengths/Weights
Sandbar Sharks are a protected species and not currently eligible for a Delaware Sport Fishing Tournament or Live Release award.
Delaware State Record
Sandbar Sharks are a protected species and are not currently eligible for any Delaware record.